Correct Use of COULD and WOULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar - - sosiski.com

Correct Use of COULD and WOULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar

Correct Use of COULD and WOULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar

YouTube

Learn how to use the modal verbs COULD and WOULD correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Many people are confused about the correct use of ‘could’ and 'would’. In this lesson, I will teach you how to use these two modal verbs without mistakes. There is a quiz at the end of the video to test your understanding. OK, there are three main differences between ‘could’ and ‘would’ that you need to know. So let’s start with the first one: This is in the use of the past tense. ‘Could’ is the past tense of ‘can’ and ‘would’ is the past tense of ‘will’. Take this sentence: “I can run a mile in 10 minutes.” This means I have this ability (to run a mile within 10 minutes). This is in the present tense but we can change it to the past by saying “I could run a mile in 10 minutes when I was younger.” It means I had the ability in the past but I don’t have it now. In this next example: “I know we will win the match.” So maybe we’re on the same team, and I tell you “I know we will win.” I’m confident. But if the match happened in the past (it’s already finished), and I want to say that I was confident, I can say “I knew we would win the match.” Here, ‘will’ becomes ‘would’. This is the first difference. The second difference relates to talking about possible situations and imaginary situations. Take this example: “It could rain tonight.” So I look at the sky and I see clouds. And I make a prediction about the future. Here’s another sentence – “John isn’t answering his phone. He could be busy.” That is I’m saying that it’s possible that he’s busy. Notice that in both of these sentences, ‘could’ is not a past tense form – it’s just used to show possibility. But I cannot use ‘would’ for this purpose. So, these are possible situations, but when we talk about imaginary situations, we prefer to use ‘would’. For example, “If I had a million dollars, I would buy a beach house.” Again, don’t be confused by the past tense. We say “If I had” and “I would buy” because we want to show that this is imagination – it’s not reality (I don’t have a million dollars). Here’s another example: “If Shirley worked hard, she would get a promotion.” This means she doesn’t work hard (she’s lazy), so she’s not going to get a promotion. Now, in both of these sentences, we can use ‘could’ to show imaginary ability but it’s less common. ‘Would’ is used a lot more when it comes to imaginary situations. This is the second difference. Let’s now move on to the third and final difference – and this is in polite expressions. There are four functions that are important for us – making suggestions, offers, requests and asking for permission. First, to make suggestions, we normally use ‘could’ as in this example: “We could try that new Italian restaurant.” So imagine that we’re planning to have dinner together and I make this suggestion. Here, using ‘would’ is wrong. But to make an offer, we prefer ‘would’. For example: “Would you like some tea?” That means, I have tea and I’m asking you if you want some. Here, we cannot use ‘could’. But making requests is different because it is possible to use both ‘could’ and ‘would’. For example, “Could you open the window, please?” You can also say, “Would you open the window, please?” although this is very formal and polite. However, we also sometimes use “Would you mind…” as in “Would you mind opening the window?” This is a request, but this phrase is fixed – you cannot say “Could you mind…?” And when we ask for permission, again there are expressions with both ‘could’ and ‘would’. For example, “Could I borrow your car for a couple of days?” Maybe I’m saying this to a friend, so I’m asking my friend for permission to use his or her car. I can also say, “Would it be OK if I borrowed your car for a couple of days?” or “Would you mind if I borrowed your car for a couple of days?” ‘Would you mind’ can be used to ask permission as well. Notice that when we use ‘would it be OK if’ or ‘would you mind if’, we use the verb in the past tense – ‘borrowed’, but that’s just a grammar rule – we’re still asking for permission for the future. Alright, these are the differences between ‘could’ and ‘would’, and if you’re ready, it’s now time for the test. There are eight sentences on the screen. In each one, I want you to choose the correct word – ‘could’ or ‘would’. Stop the video, think about your answers, then play the video again and check. Alright, here are the answers. Let me know how many you got correct in the comments.

SHOULD HAVE, COULD HAVE, WOULD HAVE - English Grammar - How to Use Should've, Could've and Would've

Can you use should have, could have and would have correctly? Watch this video and learn the correct use of these three past modals. Also see - MOST COMMON MIST

YouTube

1 Simple Trick to Become Fluent in English - the JAM Technique - How to Be a Confident Speaker

Learn how to become a FLUENT and CONFIDENT English speaker by spending just 10 minutes a day. This is the JAM technique. For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRI

YouTube

50 Words You're Pronouncing WRONGLY Right Now! | Top 50 Mispronounced English Words, Common Mistakes

Learn the TOP 50 MISPRONOUNCED English words. These words are common mistakes made by many English learners. I will show you how to avoid these incorrect pronun

YouTube

7 Stylish Ways to Ask HOW ARE YOU - Improve Your Conversation Skills

In this lesson, you will learn 7 stylish ways to ask 'how are you?' Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watc

YouTube

POWER Writing - Write ANYTHING in English Easily (Essays, Emails, Letters Etc.)

Learn 1 simple trick to write ANYTHING easily - you can use this for emails, essays, letters, reports, etc. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO

YouTube

11 Short English Conversation PHRASES - Speak Fluent English - Common Expressions in English

Speak fluent English with these 11 common English expressions. Download the full lesson notes (PDF) here: https://goo.gl/1CQUzF ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1.

YouTube

Learn ALL TENSES Easily in 30 Minutes - Present, Past, Future | Simple, Continuous, Perfect

Learn all of the 12 tenses in English easily in this lesson. This lesson features simple explanations, lots of example sentences and illustrations. ***** RELAT

YouTube

7 Words You MUST Pronounce Correctly - Sound Like a Native Speaker

Here are 7 of the most important English words that you MUST pronounce correctly if you want to sound like a native speaker. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN

YouTube

1 Simple Method to Increase Your Vocabulary | The 3R Technique | How to Improve Your Vocabulary

Learn 1 simple method to increase your vocabulary. This is the 3R technique. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube

YouTube

50 MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English Grammar - Error Identification & Correction

Find out if you make the 50 MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English, and learn how to avoid them. See all GRAMMAR LESSONS here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL

YouTube

5 Things to Practice Every Day to Improve Your English - Better Communication Skills - Become Fluent

In this lesson, you will learn the 5 things you must do daily to improve your communication skills. ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. 50 Words You Are Pronouncing

YouTube

Articles (a, an, the) - Lesson 1 - 7 Rules For Using Articles Correctly - English Grammar

In this lesson, learn the 7 rules for using articles in English correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.c

YouTube

If I was? If I were? What's the difference? | Learn English Live 38 with Steve

ask Steve: http://www.privateenglishportal.com/contact-steve

YouTube

Correct Use of WILL and WOULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar

Learn how to use the modal verbs WILL and WOULD correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.co

YouTube

Correct Use of DO / DOES / DID - Basic English Grammar - with Examples, Exercises & Quiz

Learn how to use DO, DOES and DID correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PL

YouTube

HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN - How to Use These Forms Correctly (with Examples) - English Grammar

Learn how to use have been / has been / had been correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax

YouTube

How to THINK in English - STOP Translating in Your Head & Speak Fluently Like a Native

Learn 3 easy exercises to STOP translating in your head and start thinking 100% in English. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: http

YouTube

Could, Would, and Should: MODAL Verbs [The Fearless Fluency Club]

Join The Fearless Fluency Club here: http://www.speakenglishwithvanessa.com/fluency --------------------------------------------------------------------- Subs

YouTube

WHO vs. WHOM - What's the Difference? - English Grammar - When to Use Who or Whom

Are you sometimes confused about the difference between who and whom? Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/wa

YouTube

Learn English Listening Skills - 10 GREAT Techniques to Improve Your Listening - Understand Natives

Learn 10 great techniques to improve your English listening skills and understand native speakers. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THE

YouTube